Publications

Type : Full Length Research Article; Journal / Book : Indian Journal of Natural Products and Resources; Volume : 4; Issue Number : 2; Pages : 197-204;
Publisher : NISCAIR-CSIR, India; Place Published : India;
Date : Nov, -0001 ISBN/ISSN : 0976-0512 (Online); 0976-0504 (Print);

Wild edible macrofungal species consumed by the Khasi tribe of Meghalaya, India

  • Polashree Khaund
  • Santa Ram Joshi

Abstract

Wild edible macrofungi are collected from the forests by the ethnic tribes and sold in the local markets of the Khasi hills of Meghalaya, India have been documented for their traditional knowledge and ethnic relevance. The ethnic tribal population have extensive ethnomycological knowledge based on which they discretely collect and sell the edible macrofungi. We observed considerable diversity among the edible macro-fungal species sold in the local markets. During the study period a total of 11 different species were identified based on their morphology that belonged to 9 genera and 8 families. Clavulina spp. was the most abundantly available species whereas Albatrellus spp. was rarely available in the local markets.

Keywords : Wild edible Macrofungi Ethnic tribes Clavulina spp. Mushrooms
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Url : http://nopr.niscair.res.in/handle/123456789/19905
Type : Full Length Research Article; Journal / Book : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, India Section B: Biological Sciences; Pages : 00-00;
Publisher : Springer-Verlag; Place Published : USA;
DOI : 10.1007/s40011-012-0136-8; Date : Nov, -0001 ISBN/ISSN : 0369-8211;
Plant Growth Promoting and Metal Bioadsorption Activity of Metal Tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolate Characterized from Uranium Ore Deposit
  • Barnali Sarma
  • Celin Acharya
  • Santa Ram Joshi

Abstract

In the present study, a metal-tolerant fluorescent pseudomonad isolated from uranium ore rich deposit of Domiasiat in North-East India was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa  DPs-13  based on morphological, biochemical and molecular analysis. The isolate showed higher tolerance to uranium and other metals like copper, cadmium, zinc and lead when compared with the reference strain P. aeruginosa MTCC2474. When checked for uranyl bioadsorption potential, the isolate showed 94 % (22.5 mg/L) and 72 % (342.7 mg/L)  removal  of uranium (VI) when challenged with 100 lM (23.8 mg/L) and 2 mM (476 mg/L) uranyl nitrate solutions within 1 h of incubation as compared to 68 % (16.18 mg/L) and 25 % (119 mg/L) when challenged with above concentrations respectively of uranyl nitrate by the reference strain. The isolate was resistant to most of the commonly used antibiotics like Ampicillin, Kanamycin, Chloramphenicol, Erythromycin, Aztreonam, Tetracycline,  Ciprofloxin  and Streptomycin. The isolate had no phytotoxic effect, produced siderophores, possessed phosphate  solubilising  ability as well  as  two antibiotic producing genes, and had antagonistic activity against plant pathogens. Plasmid occurrence was also noticed in the isolate. The isolate from the uranium ore rich site besides being a promising metal tolerant bacterium had potent plant growth promoting activity and can be used to promote plant growth in bioremediation approaches in metal contaminated sites.
Keywords : Pseudomonas aeruginosa DPs-13, Metals tolerance, Bioadsorption, Bioremediation
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Url : http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40011-012-0136-8
Type : Full Length Research Article; Journal / Book : Indian Journal of Biotechnology; Volume : 12; Issue Number : 1; Pages : 67-79;
Publisher : NISCAIR-CSIR, India (www.niscair.res.in); Place Published : New Delhi, India;
Date : Jan, 2013 ISBN/ISSN : 0972-5849;
Phylogenetic rearrangement of Streptomyces spp. on the basis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region using molecular morphometrics approach
  • Kaushik Bhattacharjee and S R Joshi

Abstract

Streptomycetes, the Gram positive bacteria commonly found in soil, are among the well known antibiotic producers of  microbial world. Moreover, Streptomyces spp. produce about 75% of commercially and medically useful antibiotics. They  have provided more than half of the naturally occurring antibiotics discovered to date and continue to be screened for useful  compounds. Most taxonomic and phylogenetic characterizations of Streptomyces have focused on primary DNA information  targeting linear 16S rRNA and ITS sequences. However, RNA secondary structures are particularly not been used for such  taxonomic studies, especially the systematics analysis based on “molecular morphometrics information” that are usually not  found  in  the  primary  sequences.  The  molecular  morphometrics  approach  has  been  employed  in  the  present  study  for  comparing the primary and secondary structure information of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of Streptomyces spp.  using bioinformatics tools. It is an established fact that rRNA structure is highly conserved throughout evolution as most of the  folding is functionally important despite primary sequence divergence. The analysis revealed considerable differences between  the conventional liner rRNA based phylogeny and the phylogenetic alignment using molecular morphometrics tools. 
Keywords : Internal transcribed spacer (ITS), molecular morphometrics, phylogenetics, Streptomyces
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Url : http://nopr.niscair.res.in/handle/123456789/16534
Type : Full Length Research Article; Journal / Book : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, India Section B: Biological Sciences; Volume : 83; Issue Number : 3; Pages : 277-290;
Publisher : Springer-Verlag; Place Published : USA;
DOI : 10.1007/s40011-012-0149-3; Date : Jan, 2013 ISBN/ISSN : 0369-8211;

Insights into Cave Architecture and the Role of Bacterial Biofilm

  • Subhro Banerjee
  • Santa Ram Joshi

Abstract

Caves offer a stable and protected environment from harsh and changing outside conditions. They lend living proof of the presence of minute life forms that delve deep within the earth’s crust where the possibility of life seems impossible. Devoid of all light sources and lacking the most common source of energy supplied through photosynthesis, the mysterious microbial kingdom in caves are consequently dependent upon alternative sources of energy derived from the surrounding atmosphere, minerals and rocks. There are a number of features that can be observed within a cave that may serve as evidence of microbial activity, for example, formation of biofilms comprised of multiple layers of microbial communities held together by protective gel-like polymers which form complex structures. Different bacterial biofilms can develop on the walls of the cave which can be visually distinguished by their colorations. Moreover, the pH generated by the metabolism of bacterial biofilm on the cave environment can lead to precipitation or dissolution of minerals in caves. Caves also offer an excellent scenario for studying biomineralization processes. The findings on the association of bacteria with secondary minerals as mentioned in this review will help to expand the existing knowledge in geomicrobiology and specifically on the influence of microorganisms in the formation of cave deposits. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge of biospeleology of caves and the associated bacterial biofilms. Recommendations for future research are mentioned to encourage a drift from qualitative studies to more experimental studies.

Keywords : Cave environment, Bacteria, Biofilm, Mineral precipitation, Geomicrobiology
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Url : http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40011-012-0149-3#page-1
Type : Full Length Research Article; Journal / Book : Advances in Microbiology; Volume : 2; Issue Number : 4; Pages : 465-475;
Publisher : Sciencetific Research; Place Published : Delaware, USA;
DOI : 10.4236/aim.2012.24060; Date : Dec, 2012 ISBN/ISSN : 2165-3402;

Bacterial Biofilm in Water Bodies of Cherrapunjee: The Rainiest Place on Planet Earth  

  • Subhro Banerjee
  • Sudha Rai
  • Barnali Sarma
  • Santa Ram Joshi

Abstract

Bacterial attachment is influenced by the cell surface, attachment media and other environmental factors. Bacterial community composition involved in biofilm formation in extremely high rainfall areas like Cherrapunjee has not been reported. The present study was undertaken to characterize bacteria involved in biofilm formation on different substrata in water bodies of Cherrapunjee, the highest rainfall receiving place on planet earth and to assess if the continuous rainfall has an effect on nature and colonization of biofilm bacteria. We developed the biofilm bacteria on stainless steel and glass surfaces immersed in water bodies of the study sites. Isolation of biofilm bacteria were performed on different culture media followed by estimation of protein and carbohydrate content of bacterial exopolysaccharides. 16S rRNA gene sequences were amplified for molecular characterization. The results showed that the biofilm bacterial diversity in water bodies of Cherrapunjee was influenced by substratum and was observed more in stainless steel than glass surface. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that biofilm microstructure may represent a key determinant of biofilm growth and physiology of associated bacteria. The overall protein content of the extracted EPS of all the isolates were relatively higher than the carbohydrate content. Diverse bacteria proliferated on the substrata regardless of each other's presence, with more diverse bacteria colonizing the substrata on 7th day compared to 15th day of incubation. The biofilm bacteria compositions in the highest rainfall receiving habitat were not distinctly different from reports available, hence not unique from other water bodies.

Keywords : Cherrapunjee; Rainiest Place; Water Bodies; Bacterial; Biofilm; 16S rDNA; EPS
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Url : http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?paperID=25846

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